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Neat PPC Tricks From ShoeMoney

January 16, 2007 by  

ShoeMoney, the guy who made $100K per month with AdSense, was recently asked by his reader if it’s a waste of money to bid for anything lower than the top few spots on PPC search engines.

ShoeMoney Answer: On the Pay Per Click side of Search Engine Marketing I never pay more then the minimum allowed by the search engine. So basically 10 cents (yahoo’s Minimum) is the most I ever pay per click. This method requires a lot more work and “skill” if you will because you have to come up with longtail keyword combinations, typos, and misspellings.

As far as placement goes really I do not put that much into it. I have found that I get more clicks being 1,2,3 then bad for 4,5,6,7 but ok for 8,9,10 spots. I think this stems from the same explanation as SEO that people either click on the first results or scroll to the bottom and find something that catches there eye.

He basically proves that long tail keywords work very well. If you do not have the money, you can still do well bidding on the bottom spots for a few pennies and still enjoy the conversion.

So if you are bidding $0.70 for something and it converts poorly, perhaps you could cut the bid price to $0.20 or $0.30 and the conversion rate will probably go up.

There’s a reason for this: the harder people are willing to look to find you, the more likely they are to buy. In contrast, the top spots sometimes attract impulsive clicks which increase acquisition cost.

Another trick mentioned buy ShoeMoney is that you can create your ad and place your keyword in such a way that the ad form an arrow like shape >

See example below:

shoemoneyadwords.gif

Notice how the bold words form an arrow like > shape?

This trick according to ShoeMoney increased his CTR by about 25% because the ad guides the eyes and invite users to click on it. I’ve never tried this before but I wonder what will happen when everyone tries it.

But like everything else, you should test each method to see if it works in your situation.

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